Anonymous

2011-11-04 10:20
 
What it's about:

Set in the political snakepit of Elizabethan England, the film blatantly questions the authorship of arguably the greatest writers in the English literary canon – William Shakespeare. Anonymous poses an alternative suggestion to who the author of the famous works could have been, focusing on a time when cloak-and-dagger political intrigue, illicit romances in the Royal Court and the schemes of greedy nobles hungry for the power of the throne were exposed in the most unlikely of places: the London stage.

What we thought:

Literature buffs will shrivel in disgust. Historians will writhe in agony, and countless others will be left befuddled by the sheer audacity of a film which so brazenly parades what seems to be a preposterous premise. And yet, there will be even more who might find this film strangely fascinating. Whether you're a sucker for a juicy conspiracy theory or a campaigner for historical accuracy – one has to admit that despite its many, many faults, Anonymous is a wickedly entertaining film.

Director Roland Emmerich –thus far only known for a slew of mediocre to middling films has gone all out to capture a lush and exciting Elizabethan period piece – with a twist. In this Tudor England, we are introduced to a world where there was no humble Stratfordian genius by the name of Shakespeare but rather an illiterate, self-absorbed actor who stumbles across the chance to claim the authorship of the true writer's plays.

The true writer in this postulation is none other than a nobleman Edward De Vere - the Earl of Oxford. Departing from the so-called Oxfordian (conspiracy) theory the film then accumulates with alarming speed a plot so thick with intrigue, scandal and schemes it's quite frankly hard to keep up.

Despite the over-the-top-ness of the whole production iit can be noted that the acting really isn't half bad. Rhys Ifans gives a thrilling performance as the mysterious Earl of Oxford, while Vanessa Redgrave's lecherous, tempestuous Queen Elizabeth I is as ludicrous as it is magnetic.

If you’re a Stratfordian purist or remotely English by birth – avoid Anonymnous at all costs. If you’re up to getting sucked into an absorbing if not thoroughly amusing Tudor conspiracy tale – do indulge.



If you’re up to getting sucked into an absorbing if not thoroughly amusing Tudor conspiracy tale – do indulge.
Read more on:    william shakespeare  |  anonymous  |  movies

Ian 2011/11/09 12:41 PM
  • Rating:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
I thought this subject had been covered in one of Mr Beans' (Time Travel) episodes? And do you give a star rating if you haven't seen it yet???????
Ian 2011/11/09 12:43 PM
  • Rating:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
I thought this subject had been covered in one of Mr Beans' (Time Travel) episodes? And do you give a star rating if you haven't seen it yet???????
Moop 2011/11/09 7:38 PM
  • Rating:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
I love these costume dramas - Shakespeare in love, etc., and I will definitely watch this offering. However, the authorship of the Plays has been attributed to several entities - even Milton. The Earl of Oxford supposition is an old one. The funny thing is that each alternative seems so plausible when read. I still like to think Shakespeare the man wrote the lot, but my enjoyment will not be dimmed if one day he is proved not to have done so.
NEXT ON CHANNELX
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.