The World Unseen

2009-03-02 13:07
 
The World Unseen
 
What’s the movie about:

In 1950s South Africa, two women find love in surprising places. Lisa Ray stars as Miriam, a domesticated mother of three, while Sheetal Sheth plays Amina, a progressive café owner. Though the women appear to have little in common, they are instantly drawn to one another, and a forbidden affair begins.


What we though about it:

Art never looked as beautiful as it does in The World Unseen. The movie centres on a love affair but draws on the issues occurring in 1950s South Africa.  This winner of 11 SAFTAs (South African Film and Television Awards) is inspired by the true stories of Sarif’s own grandmother, and is based on Sarif’s debut novel of the same name.

Miriam is the typical good, doting Indian wife to her chauvinistic, frustrated husband, Omar, who is having an affair with his brother’s wife Farah, played by local beauty Natalie Becker (who won a SAFTA for her role).

Amina, on the other hand, is a free-spirit who has broken all the rules of her conventional Indian community by defying apartheid laws by running a place that's a safe haven for laughter, music and good home-cooked food – regardless of race. Of course, this makes her business an easy target for the security police, particularly the short-tempered De Witt (Colin Moss) whose venomous grudge against Amina and her friends seethes with the anger, violence, resentment and hopelessness of the period.

Put simply, The World Unseen keeps you entranced from the beginning until the closing credits roll. Sarif's story is beautifully told as she draws you into an emotional rollercoaster where love pays the price for politics and societal conventions.

The characters are sympathetically drawn, and their dilemmas are a heart-breaking reflection on the struggles of a generation that continues to thrive today, albeit in a liberated South Africa. This is no mere struggle movie. It aims for the heart and hits its target. The World Unseen is deserving of the warm South African reception it has received, and will undoubtedly leave a lasting impression on the local film landscape.



You can’t help who you fall in love with, but things get particularly complicated for two women when family expectations and Apartheid get in the way.

peter 2009/02/16 4:43 PM
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a very good review, well written
Fred 2009/02/17 4:42 PM
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looks very interesting.
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