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Juanes - La Vida Es Un Ratico

2010-07-02 12:40

On his latest album La Vida…Es Un Ratico (Life…Is A Moment) Juanes, born Juan Esteban Aristizábal Vásquez, confirms why critics are hailing him as the “biggest”, “greatest”, “most influential” and “most important” Latin artist of his generation. Besides caring for his lean healthy body, Juanes also advocates love, freedom and world peace which are evident in his soulful mix of Colombian-rock music.

And of course, no English for this 17-time Latin Grammy award winner who only sings in his native tongue, Spanish, and still manages to be a multi-platinum selling artist. Respect! Not understanding a word Juanes is singing about (except if you use google) forces you to listen with your heart; music is after all a universal language, right? In this case it’s also definitely the language of love and you will surrender your soul to its magical powers! Well, I did.

Album opener “No Creo En El Jamas” (I Don’t Believe In Never) is an upbeat catchy rock tune that’s a definite must for your iPod – especially if you use it for exercise - because it’ll make you feel victorious after running up that hill ( just imagine Juanes at the top, you’ll make it in no time!).

“Me Enamora” (It Makes Me Fall In Love) contains some awesome octave electric guitar riffs and wailing solos from Juanes’ Fender Stratocaster which made me fall in love with, I mean that will make you fall in love with him...“Hoy me Voy” (Today I Go) throws all inhibition out the door with its sexy Spanish rhythm crawling its way through every inch of your body; so feel it, it is definitely here!

Title track, “La Vida...Es un Ratico” (Life...Is A Moment), is a beautiful slow piano rock ballad on which Juanes struts his melodic guitar skills once again. “The trees are crying, they are the witnesses of many years of violence” recites Juanes and Andrés Calamaro on this piece of sad soulful poetry (“Minas Piedras” – Stone Mines) concerning Juanes’ humanitarian work with mine victims.

Every song on this album brings something unique to the table: the production, the instrumentation, the vocals and especially the great guitarwork from the man himself, is flawless without being over-the-top. So just a pretty face? I don’t think so.

Dark hair, olive skin, stubble beard, firm tattooed biceps, Colombian, activist, guitarist...sounds perfect, hey? Did I mention guitarist...oh yes I did, silly me! And guess what? He can sing beautifully as well.

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