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Getting to know sports broadcaster Motshidisi Mohono

2019-12-19 23:50
Motshidisi Mohono
Motshidisi Mohono. (PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES/GALLO IMAGES).

Johannesburg - From Katlehong to the world, award-winning sports broadcaster Motshidisi Mohono (30) put on a spectacle as SuperSport’s first woman to anchor a Rugby World Cup final – a career highlight for the accounting graduate.  Here’s five things you might not have known about her.

READ MORE: Watch: Motshidisi Mohono dishes on her five favourite sport-related things

DADDY’S GIRL

She was introduced to sports by her father.

“Sports has always been a part of my life, my dad was a major football man, he loved his local football. He would hop us onto the couch as kids and we would watch football all day and on weekends while my mom was at work. That’s how we were introduced to football,” she tells DRUM.

 She later learnt all about cricket and she played netball and hockey at school.

STARTING FROM THE BOTTOM

Motshidisi’s first job was at a tuck shop in Katlehong called Smiling Tree when she was 15 years old. She used her pay to purchase stationery and for pocket money during the December holidays. Her career has blossomed since her days as a radio presenter at UJFM, YFM and Metro FM. Her resume now boasts anchoring gigs for Varsity Cup and Super Rugby matches and the Currie Cup final.

A GIRL WITH A PLAN

An accounting graduate from the University of Johannesburg, Motshidisi traded numbers to be mentored by industry mavens such as Carol Tshabalala and Thato Moeng. Her ultimate goal is to live up to her potential. “I’m not yet quite sure what that looks like. I want to operate and live to my fullest potential. That’s the ultimate dream, and to change lives while doing that.”

PASSIONATE WITH A SIDE TALENT

Apart from being a sports fanatic and homebody, Motshidisi has a knack for writing. “I’m finding that I articulate myself [better] about things that are going on in my career and in my life.”

LINGUISTICALLY CAPABLE

A Sotho girl, Motshidisi is fluent in Sesotho, isiZulu, Afrikaans and English. While she’s keen on perfecting her isiXhosa, she also wants to learn to speak French and Spanish to be able to converse at heart level with international teams where English is not their first language.

Read more on: tv